Thursday, November 12, 2015

Thick and Doughy

I went back to House of Fishball to eat the signature mini dumplings (pot stickers aka "guo tie" in mandarin) - MYR7 nett for a serving of 8 because "Eat What Eat Where" wrote that they are slightly thick and doughy and I like to eat thick and doughy dumplings.

Yes, the skin is thicker than gyoza and doughy chewy soft which I like. Maybe in another few months, I would be back to eat this.

Tau Kan (thick gluten puffs) stuffed with fish paste - 1 piece for MYR2.50 nett and I ordered two pieces which comes up to MYR5 nett.

I like to eat the soft many layers of gluten but for this, the layers were not apparent because they were compressed by the fish paste in the middle so I don't think I will order this again.

Handmade Fish Noodle with Glass Noodle - MYR8 nett - for those who like noodle made with fish paste.

Barley Soy Bean Sheet Ginkgo - MYR3.50 nett - sweet but not too sweet. I like to eat the Ginkgo and Barley.
Tau Foo Fa (Soy Bean Curd) - MYR4 nett - the menu says not made with gypsum so it is a healthy version of the usual tau foo fa made with gypsum. I am not sure what they use to replace the gypsum to curdle the soy milk but there is a sort of buttery or milky taste in this bowl of tau foo fa so my spouse did not like it and asked me to finish it.

30 comments:

  1. What's that tau kan? Don;t think we have that here. Sure looks like something I would enjoy. 8 for RM7 is cheap.

    They're pan-fried, the dumplings. My girl would love these, I know. I love tau foo fa with that brown caramel syrup - here, it's just sugar syrup, not as nice.

    Noodles made from fish paste? I love nice fish balls and fish cake but no, thanks. Tried that in Sandakan - like eating fish cake cut into thin strips. Not quite my idea of noodles.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tau kan is wheat gluten. It is commonly found in vegetarian meals served in Chinese temples:

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheat_gluten_(food)

      The fish paste noodles are much softer than fish cakes. You could buy the tau foo fa as takeaway without any syrup and make your own brown caramel syrup to eat with it at home. Yes, I am sure Melissa would like the pan fried dumplings.

      Delete
  2. Yummzz, I love these dumplings! Love the skin too.. I can eat 20 pcs ! That fuchuk-yee-mai also nice, I can drink a lot everytime my mum boils it when I go home..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think you can eat 40 of these dumplings because they are mini versions. Do you boil barley soy bean sheet at home for your boys to drink?

      Delete
  3. so-so to the dumplings to me, but i would actually like to try that tau kan stuffed with fish paste.. and you had a mixture of fish noodles and glass noodles there, i have never tried this combination before, haha.. as for the desserts, i will opt for the barley bean sheet ginkgo too~~ :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Do you like to eat tau kan? To me, this deep fried tau kan with fish paste inside is no difference to deep fried soy bean curd sheet with fish paste inside.

      Delete
  4. I also like thick chewy skin for dumplings, lots of bite there.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yay! you do too. So have you made any thick chewy skin dumplings at home to eat?

      Delete
  5. I like dumpling...this kind to be exact. Love to go with vinegar and ginger slices.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Vinegar and ginger slices to go with them = yums! Do you make your own at home?

      Delete
  6. I like the Tau Foo Fa, yum yum, is it sweet, if sweet, I like!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Oh I just had fried pork dumplings awhile ago.. it didn't taste that good though compare to the authentic ones.. this one looks really great

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Does your fried pork dumplings look exactly like this?

      Delete
  8. I like how a negative comment I have about a particular food turns out positive for someone else which goes to say that all of us have different tastes....and that's perfectly alright (no need to get uptight, like some people, when they don't like the things you like). I liked that you went out looking for this specific thing I didn't like....the thick and doughy dumplings....and liked them....haha! :D

    You tau kan didn't look as good as the one I had....check out the difference in the thickness of the fish paste. And I'm in agreement with your spouse on the tau fu fah.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tell me about it! My spouse and I have totally different taste in food - I like cheese, butter, seaweed but he does not. He likes deep fried lard, bacon, pork belly and I don't.

      Your tau kan has much thicker fish paste but I am not looking for the fish paste. I think to eat the thick soft many layers of tau kan so I definitely did not find it here as the layers have been compressed by the fish paste into a compact thick layer and since it is deep fried, it is no longer chewy and soft. The tau kan texture is now like deep fried soy bean curd sheet but what did I expect. Doh! My bad!

      Delete
  9. Me no like such dumplings. I prefer the skin to be crispy if the dumpling is deep fried. Thick and chewy is yucks to me, if the dough is thick, I rather they be boiled and served in soup...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like both boiled in soup or pan fried for thick and doughy ones. I also like those very crispy deep fried local Cantonese style ones (I like the kan sui taste) like those here:

      http://muntalksfood.blogspot.my/2015/10/taste-house-kitchen-bakery.html

      I guess I am just sei sik, seems like I like to eat all types, hahaha!

      Delete
  10. I like dumpling, any meat dumpling would be fine for me...deep fried or boiled...all I can 'sapu habis'!

    ReplyDelete
  11. I prefer my dumplings to have thin skin and not deep fried.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think you like those Cantonese style sui kao in soup like the ones here:

      http://muntalksfood.blogspot.my/2015/10/meng-kee-char-siew.html

      Delete
  12. You'd love the dumplings in Shanghai (dunno if other places are like that too). The skin is made so thick that one serving of dumpling skin is the carbo equivalent of a serving of rice!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When I was in Shanghai I only ate the famous xiu long bao with a super long queue. When I was in Beijing, I ate a lot of dumplings (jiaozi). Like you said, their skin is very thick and I really like to eat them. Can't find them here so far with skin as thick as that. They sell the jiaozi by kati and I order half katis (600g) with eggs and chives fillings. Here I heard there is a jiaozi shop operated by someone from China in Puchong so I went to eat there. Nice but still the skin is not as thick as those I ate in Beijing. Maybe people here just do not like thick skin so they have to make the skin thinner to suit the local market.

      Delete
    2. Haha so you've had them before. :) And yes most people here can't take skin that thick!

      Delete
    3. Yes, when I was in Beijing. :)

      Delete
  13. I like the gingko and barley dessert, healthy and delicious..prefer not too sweet too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I prefer not too sweet tong sui too.

      Delete