Monday, November 23, 2015

Authentic Kampua Noodle?

Kampua Noodle (Regular) - MYR6.80 nett
The noodle is firm but not springy and is thicker than the thin wanton noodle. According to this review, the kampua taste is authentic.

Bien Nuik - sold out but is this the same as Pian Sip?

Sarawak Gui Chap (Kway Chap - Regular Portion) - MYR7.50 nett

Tau Suan (Mung Bean Sweet Soup with Chinese Crullers aka yau char kwai) - MYR2.50 nett

Click on the above for a larger image if you are interested to read the founder history.
The founder is from Sarawak and has opened 4 branches of SRK Noodle House to share the food of Sarawak with people in the Klang valley. I will be back to try the Sarawak Laksa and Bian Bian Hu (Ding Bian Hu).

Please click on the above to read the words.

No GST and No Service Charges

SRK Noodle House (Sri Petaling branch)

Opened a few months ago at the shoplot which used to be Janbo Restaurant a few years ago.

38 comments:

  1. When I see kampua noodles, first came into mind is Suituapui, hehe!

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    1. Because he always eat them or write about them?

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  2. ooopsss.. i agree with both hands and legs raised up to 小影's comment, hahaha.. kampua reminds me of him, and that man in their signage got me thinking if he is actually the spokesperson!! hahaha~~ :p

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    1. The man in the signage should be the founder.

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    2. Eh SK, that fatty mascot outside looks like your once God Father from Sibu!! Muahahahaha

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  3. never been to Sarawak, so I'm not sure about the authenticity of the kampua noodles too...u give me any noodle..i jst wallop...dun care whether it is authentic or not..Since this place quite nearby, I will drop by one day to try out the noodles.

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    1. You like to eat all types of noodle?

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  4. I will not say no to Sarawak noodles, they are simply different and yummy, it would be best to taste the authentic Sarawak noodles in Sarawak.

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    1. It is like tasting authentic pizza in Italy, right? ;p

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  5. I read the history, interesting history

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  6. Looks very nice - the die-hards would frown on the minced meat topping but my favourite in town has it too. Generally exclusively in Kuching kolo mee only but if it makes something nicer, I am all for it.

    That looks like kueh chap - is it beef? Hence, the name, gui or ngui chap?if the soup is very fragrant, something like bak kut teh soup with a hint of five spice fragrance, then it is good. If it is just like nothing more than soy sauce, then it is not. Also more a Kuching thing, but catching on here - more places selling this now.

    No let tao suan in Sibu, only in Kuching - I guess it is not a Foochow thing. I love it a lot! Been wanting to cook my own but the spirit is willing, the flesh is weak. Sobssss!!!!

    Founder from Miri, eh? Not really a Foochow town but Wong is most likely Foochow. The irony is there are many traditional Foochow delights that have died out here or only some not nice ones are available here but are available there - like the Foochow-style kacang tumbuk, for instance. Maybe, many have moved there - where all the money is...and Kuching...and Kl too. LOL!!!

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    1. Yes, that is kueh chap, they just spell it differently, it is pork. You are right, my spouse told me too that it tastes like bak kut teh soup.

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  7. When you just mentioned that it's authentic, it made me automatically wants to try it, I have a question mun, are noodles healthy? this is just a tip for those who are health conscious... :)

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    1. Noodles basically is made from flour (wheat or rice flour), water and eggs (some with eggs, some without) so what do you think - healthy or not?

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  8. The Sarawak gu-chap attracts me very much, I wana taste the soup! haha..

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    1. My spouse says the soup tastes like bak kut teh.

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  9. Yes, bien nuik is the same as pian sip or what is similar to wantan here. For me, kampua mee = kolo mee = mee pok....all taste almost similar except noodles differently shaped....hee...hee! :D

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    1. Hahahahaha, don't let STP hear you say that! :D

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  10. Hmm, looks quite like the one I've eaten in Kuching, so I will trust the authenticity. And the founder history is so detailed, unlike most of those "The founder aspires to change the world, the founder has vision to make kampua become world gourmet food,bla bla bla". Nice!

    Did you like the tau suan? I want to know if it is only me who finds it tastes weird.

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    1. No weird taste for the tau suan. I find it ok, just like any tong sui - it is sweet and has mung beans in it. What did you find weird about it?

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    2. I just felt the combination of mung bean soup + yao zhar guai weird hahaha!

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    3. Do you eat yao char guai with red bean tong sui or with soya milk then? I feel it is the same because just eat yao char guai with tong sui only mah, hahaha!

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  11. Oh, so can go to this place to experience kampua noodles! But we need Mr Arthur Wee to taste and get his verdict on whether it is authentic or not hee..hee...

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    1. The other branches would be nearer to your place.

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  12. Yes, must let Arthur Wee taste and see... sedap or not... looks good though...

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    1. You have been to Sibu to eat kampua so you can also taste, see and tell, right?

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  13. The founder is from Sarawak so I guess it would be as authentic as you could get. I just have kueh chap this morning. Yours look like good as well but my soup was thicker and darker.

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    1. Yours taste like bak kut teh or not?

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    2. Does not taste like bak kut teh. Taste sweeter. Milder herb than bkt.

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  14. I love to eat Kueh chap and Kampua noodles. I have often wondered where this Kueh Chap originated from?? in 1991, I was shocked to see the shops in Chinatown San Francisco selling instant Kueh Chaps in packets and they were manufactured in Bangkok, Thailand! I bought them to try and it was almost like the original with enough herbs etc. My Thai relatives in SF told me it has long been selling there.

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    1. I also wonder about this. I only knew about kueh chap when I ate them in Singapore in the 1990s.

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  15. This looks like a good place to eat. Everything looks good.

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    1. That time I went, nearly all the tables are occupied.

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  16. with this cold weather, this soups are just perfect!

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