Tuesday, December 8, 2015

SRK Noodle House

We went back to SRK Noodle House to try the other dishes.

Sarawak Laksa - MYR7.80 nett - taste ok despite not looking good. Not that spicy.

Ding Bian Hu 鼎边糊 (Bien Bien Hu on the menu) - MYR9.80 nett. The noodle (rice sheets) is made by pouring rice paste all around the sides of the wok and when it is cooked, it is broken up into pieces and pushed into the broth which is cooking inside the wok. The portion here is quite a lot but I managed to finish it.

24 comments:

  1. I have not tasted Sarawak Laksa before. But I think I have eaten the 2nd dish by the way you describe the cooking of the rice sheet. We used to cook it that way too but the soup may be different.

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    1. You know how to cook this dish. That's great!

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  2. The laksa looks rather over-lemak. People here like it that way but not the die-hards in Kuching. They say it becomes more like curry, no longer Kuching laksa.

    A very very old friend from here, now living in Miri, just shared a photo of the Sibu kampua here on Facebook yesterday. He said it was very good...and for someone from here to say that, I guess it gets the approval stamp.

    He mentioned SRK in Puchong...and from the comments, it seems they have branches all over? There's the Kitchen Inn, something like this, in Perth - kampua AUD7.50 and then they opened an outlet in Melbourne, AUD8.50...and they just opened another one in Brisbane. Gee!!! These people are laughing all the way to the bank.

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    1. SRK has a few branches in the Klang Valley, I know of another one in Subang Jaya.

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  3. The portion does look big. The laksa like STP said, was pretty lemak. More of curry laksa than Sarawak laksa.

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    1. But I thought Sarawak laksa is more about the taste of the special spices used which is different from the spices used in curry?

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  4. SRK for Shah Rukh Khan?? hehe.. delicious food doesn't need to look good huh?? once you tried it, you won't be bothered by how they look.. so the 鼎邊糊 must be very nice since you could finish it despite its huge portion..

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    1. SRK is short form for Sarawak I believe. I let my friend eat some of the noodle.

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  5. I never ordered Sarawak Laksa from anywhere before due to that reason too. Doesn't look very appetizing. :P

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    1. Due to what reason? Does not look appetising?

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    2. Yeah. I'm judging the laksa by its looks.

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    3. ok but how would you know how it would look like if you don't order it first?

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  6. It is not easy to find very good Sarawak Laksa in KL. Anywhere?
    This Ding Bian Hu is a new dish to me. I believe I will like it so long as they are soupy. Did the rice sheet taste similar to the Koay Chiap??

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    1. A good Sarawak laksa can be found in Lucky Garden, Bangsar. This Ding Bian Hu rice sheet tastes similar to the rice sheet in Koay Chiap.

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  7. Nowadays I cannot take spicy, prefer the soupy noodles anytime.. looks good..

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    1. Soup noodles is easier to swallow.

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  8. I have yet to taste Sarawak Laksa. The Ding Bian Hu is something new to me.

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    1. There is a good Sarawak Laksa in Bangsar, Lucky Garden.

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  9. I'm not a huge fan of Sarawak laksa as the broth has more curry powder spice taste (much like Ipoh's curry). I prefer our lemak kind of curry laksa...hee...hee! ;) Those rice sheet noodles, would you say it taste more like Hong Kong chee cheong fun?

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    1. The spices used for Sarawak laksa are different from those used in curry powder. They taste different. No, the rice sheet does not taste like HK ccf, more like kway chap rice sheet.

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  10. Oh so that's called bien bien hu!

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    1. Normally is called Ding Bian Hu.

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  11. Hmm the name and method of the 2nd one isn't familiar to me. The closest I can think of is when people dribble in the batter to make long-ish noodles. Interesting...

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    1. The batter is poured into the wok all around the sides of the wok, not dribble. There is a good utube showing how this is done if you search for it using "Ding Bian Hu" as the keyphrase.

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